Critique and Criticism

A distinction needs to be made between “critique” and “criticism.” In my view, a critique is a dialogue that takes place between teacher and student, mentor and mentee. The purpose is instructional and informative: feedback is provided to guide and improve the student. By contrast, criticism is a written analysis: a viewer examining a work or body of art and communicating  the reader with an educated opinion or insight. For high school students, these are sometimes foreign concepts and formative guidance is often necessary.

Critique & Presentation Format

  1. Introduce yourself.
  2. Explain the visual problem you’ve addressed. (This assures your audience that you begin on common ground.)
  3. Describe the challenges you confronted and use a positive tone: “I had to consider what two very dissimilar objects had in common.” as opposed to a negative voice: “Combining two different things was a really stupid assignment.”
  4. Explain how you solved the problem. How did you use techniques, media choices, subject choices to effectively address the visual problem? Be sure to explain using artistic vocabulary, but use real world examples to make connections for your audience: “I selected complimentary colors to create a sense of vibrancy, much like the purple and gold contrasts of a football jersey.”
  5. Re-state the problem and summarize how your work solves the problem.

Thank your audience and ask for questions.

Audience Responsibility: Ask Questions and Provide Helpful Feedback. For example:

▪    Ask “why” and “how” questions.

▪    “Have you considered…”

▪    “Did you try …?”

▪    “Have you thought about….”

▪    “I wonder what would happen if…”

▪    “I would recommend…”

 

Cross Content Writing Rubric

ART: Art Criticism

 

 

Beginning
1

Developing
2

Accomplished
3

Exemplary
4

Score

Stated Objective or Performance

CRITERIA

 

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting a beginning level of performance.

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting development and movement toward mastery of performance.

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting mastery of performance.

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting the highest level of performance

Stated Objective or Performance

 

Production and Distribution of Writing

 

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

 

Describe

With assistance is able to use at least one descriptor to describe an artwork. Descriptor may be based on opinion. Independently uses at least some descriptors to describe an artwork. Descriptors may partially be based on opinion rather than observable fact. Uses at multiple observably factual descriptors do describe an artwork. Uses a variety of observably factual descriptors to richly describe artistic characteristics of specific artworks.  
 

 

 

 

 

Analyze

With assistance can identify at least one element or principle. Identifies the significant elements and principles within the artwork. Identifies and adequately explains the significant elements and principles present in the work. Identifies the significant elements and principles within the work and the affect they have on the artwork.  
 

 

 

 

 

Interpret

With assistance can develop a personal opinion of the work. Is able to express a personal opinion about artworks: “This is what I think.” Based on gathered information, the student is able to come to a conclusion about the artist’s intention: “This is why I think this way.” Using supporting detail based upon gathered information, the student articulates a personally-relevant conclusion about an artist’s intention and/or purpose.  
 

Judge

With assistance the student can state whether or not they like an artwork Student is able to state the social value of an artwork. Student can articulate how the work benefits others and defend his/her personal opinion of an artwork Student is able to draw conclusions from history and contemporary culture to express reasoned, personal opinions about the social value of specific artworks.  

 

 

Cross Content Writing Rubric

ART: General Writing in the Art Content Area

 

 

Beginning
1

Developing
2

Accomplished
3

Exemplary
4

Score

Stated Objective or Performance

CRITERIA

 

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting a beginning level of performance.

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting development and movement toward mastery of performance.

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting mastery of performance.

Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting the highest level of performance

Stated Objective or Performance

 

Production and Distribution of Writing

 

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

 

Main Idea

No main idea evidenced. Key word (s) near beginning. Main idea or topic in first sentence, but ideas may be confusing or unclear. Clear main idea or topic sentence. Clearly stated main idea or topic sentence that provides insight or challenges the reader’s thinking.  
 

 

 

 

 

Organization

No visible organization. A paragraph may be divided by sentences but not by content. Some order of main ideas or details may be evidenced. Sentences may evidence a loosely sequenced hierarchy of ideas. Ideas are appropriately divided into paragraphs with supporting details. A clear transition is evidenced from beginning to middle to end. Structure follows a logical organizational pattern and conveys a sense of wholeness and completeness. Transitions serve to clearly connect ideas.  
 

 

 

 

 

Details

No supporting details. Related words mentioned; limited basic vocabulary. Partially defends topic. Attempts to use new key words in description; goes beyond basic vocabulary. Clearly defends topic. Uses newly learned key/related words and ideas correctly; varies language. Clearly defends topic using variety of support. Uses newly learned key words/ideas easily; uses precise language and is suitable to topic and audience.  
 

Mechanics

Many grammatical, punctuation, case, and spelling errors. Some sentences may be fragments or run-on. Mechanical errors hide the writer’s meaning. Some grammatical, punctuation, case, and spelling errors. Complete sentences; few run-ons. Mechanical errors may partially impede the writer’s meaning. Few grammatical, punctuation, case, or spelling errors. Complete sentences, no run-ons or fragments; some variety in length and type. Mechanics do not disguise the writer’s meaning. The mechanics of grammar, punctuation, case enhance the writer’s meaning. Sentences vary in length and type, and relate to the style of writing.  

 

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