AP Art History

Course Title: AP Art History

Department: Visual Arts

Rationale: This course offers a chronological survey of Western art. Lessons will cover the history of art from the Paleolithic period through the late Gothic era in Northern Europe. Students will engage in critical thinking and analysis as they develop a contextual understanding of diverse examples of art forms, including architecture, sculpture, painting, and design. Students will be expected to complete a rigorous course of study, with a heavy emphasis upon independent research, analysis, and academic synthesis.

The tenets of this course are excellent compliments to the specific objectives of Common Core State Standards for Literacy: reading, writing, presenting, speaking. This is a research and writing intensive course emphasizing high level, factual, academic and content-specific language, supported by diverse cited high quality sources. Research clearly indicates a high achievement rate for face-to-face classroom settings in which student workshopping and Socratic dialogue take place.

Course Objectives with Core Academic Standards for the Course:

1: Prehistoric Art
Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I]

◦       Classify types of Prehistoric art and their respective media.

◦       Analyze pictorial conventions employed in Paleolithic and Neolithic art.

◦       Describe the roles of animal and human figures in Paleolithic and Neolithic art.

◦       Categorize the purposes and techniques of monumental architecture during the Neolithic era.

2: The Ancient Near East

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.!.B]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of ancient Near Eastern art and architecture.

◦       Evaluate the relationship of art, architecture, and religion in the ancient Near East.

◦       Analyze the function of religious and secular art and architecture.

◦       Categorize materials and techniques of ancient Near Eastern art and architecture.

3: Ancient Egypt

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I.B]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of painting and sculpture from the Early Dynastic to New Kingdom periods.

◦       Compare and contrast the differences in New Kingdom painting and sculpture of the Amarna Period with those represented in the established canon.

◦       Contrast characteristics of conceptual representation in Egyptian art against that of optical reality.

◦       Categorize examples of art, monumental art, and architecture.

4: The Aegean

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I.B]

◦       Identify the formal characteristics of Cycladic, Minoan, and Mycenaean art and architecture.

◦       Analyze the dispersion of ideas, artistic trends, and motifs in Aegean cultures.

◦       Classify examples of Aegean architecture using content-specific vocabulary.

◦       Categorize the materials and techniques used to create prehistoric Aegean art and architecture.

5: Ancient Greece

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I.A]

◦       Identify the formal characteristics of Geometric, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic period art.

◦       Classify examples of ancient Greek architecture using content-specific vocabulary.

◦       Analyze the changes in representations of the human figure throughout ancient Greek period art.

◦       Categorize the materials and techniques used to create ancient Greek art and architecture.

6: The Roman Empire

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I.B]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of art and architecture from the Roman Empire.

◦       Analyze the forms, materials, and construction techniques of Roman architecture.

◦       Categorize the materials and processes used to create Roman art.

◦       Evaluate historical events and characters that influenced the development of Roman art and architecture.

7: Early Medieval Europe
Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of early medieval art.

◦       Categorize the materials and techniques employed in early medieval art and architecture.

◦       Analyze the Carolingian Renaissance and its impact on art and architecture.

◦       Evaluate the role monasteries played in the creation, preservation, and dissemination of manuscripts.

◦       Analyze the influence of metalwork on early medieval painting and sculpture.

8: Romanesque Europe

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I.C]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of Romanesque art.

◦       Categorize the regional variations in Romanesque figural arts and architecture.

◦       Analyze the role of art within (and on) Romanesque churches.

◦       Evaluate the role of monastic orders in the creation of Romanesque art and architecture.

9: Gothic Europe

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I.D]

◦       Distinguish regional differences in Gothic art and architecture.

◦       Identify the parts of the plan and elevation of Gothic churches and their functions.

◦       Classify examples of classical influence in works of art and architecture.

◦       Compare and contrast the formal and iconographic characteristics of Early through Late Gothic figural art.

◦       Evaluate the materials and techniques employed in Gothic art and architecture.

10: Italy, 1200–1400

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.I.D]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of fourteenth-century Italian art.

◦       Analyze the role humanism played in fourteenth-century Italian art.

◦       Classify the art and architecture created for monastic orders.

◦       Categorize the material, formal, and technical characteristics of fourteenth-century Italian architecture.

◦       Evaluate the reintroduction of the optical experience in the art of the fourteenth century.

11: Northern Europe, 1400–1500

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.A]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of fifteenth-century Northern European art.

◦       Distinguish between art produced in Flanders, France, Germany, and Spain.

◦       Categorize the artists, materials, and techniques of fifteenth-century Northern European art.

◦       Analyze the influence patrons had on examples of fifteenth-century Northern European art.

12: Italy, 1400–1500

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.A]

◦       Classify the key aspects of Renaissance art and architectural theory.

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of fifteenth-century Italian art.

◦       Identify artists of fifteenth-century Italian art and architecture.

◦       Analyze the role and influence of patrons and the integration of sacred and secular concerns.

◦       Categorize the materials and techniques of Renaissance painting, sculpture, and printmaking.

13: Italy, 1500–1600

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.A]

◦       Describe the formal and iconographic characteristics of High Renaissance, Venetian, and Mannerist painting and sculpture.

◦       Describe the materials and techniques of Renaissance painting and sculpture.

◦       Explain how the experiments of fifteenth-century art were employed by sixteenth-century artists.

◦       Compare the artistic philosophies of the High Renaissance with the thinking of previous periods of art making.

◦       Discuss the status of artists in Renaissance society.

◦       Describe the architectural achievements of the High Renaissance.

◦       Identify specific examples of sixteenth-century Italian art.

14: Northern Europe and Spain, 1500–1600

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.B]

◦       Describe the formal and iconographic characteristics of sixteenth-century art in Northern Europe and Spain.

◦       Explain the influence of Italian Renaissance and Mannerist art in Northern Europe and Spain.

◦       Explain how sixteenth-century Northern European and Spanish art reflects the principles of the Protestant Reformation and those of the Catholic Counter-Reformation.

◦       Describe how patrons employed art and architecture in the sixteenth century.

◦       Discuss the history, processes, and functions of prints in Northern Europe.

◦       Identify specific examples of sixteenth-century northern European and Spanish art.

15: Italy and Spain, 1600–1700

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.B]

◦       Describe the formal and iconographic characteristics of seventeenth-century art and architecture as shown in Italy and Spain.

◦       Discuss the significance of social and political events to the production and use of art and architecture in Italy and Spain.

◦       Explain the influence of the Catholic Counter-Reformation on seventeenth-century art and architecture in Italy and Spain.

◦       Explain the significance of the classical tradition in examples of seventeenth-century art and architecture in Italy and Spain.

◦       Analyze the shifting status of artists and architects in the seventeenth century.

◦       Identify specific examples of seventeenth-century Italian and Spanish art.

16: Northern Europe, 1600–1700

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.B]

◦       Describe the formal and iconographic characteristics of seventeenth-century art and architecture as shown in Northern Europe.

◦       Discuss the significance of social and political events to the production and use of art and architecture in Northern Europe.

◦       Explain the influence of the Catholic Counter-Reformation on seventeenth-century art and architecture in Northern Europe.

◦       Explain the significance of the classical tradition in examples of seventeenth-century art and architecture in Northern Europe.

◦       Analyze the shifting status of artists and architects in the seventeenth century.

◦       Identify specific examples of seventeenth-century northern European art.

17: China and Korea After 1279

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.III]

◦       Discuss the impact the Mongol emperors had on the arts of China.

◦       Differentiate Chinese literati painters in the Yuan and Ming dynasties.

◦       Elaborate on foreign influences in Chinese art and architecture.

◦       Describe the impact of Chinese architecture on Korean architecture.

◦       Analyze the importance of gardens to Chinese culture.

◦       Identify specific characteristics and examples of Chinese and Korean art.

18: Japan After 1336
Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.III]

◦       Discuss the discipline and meditation of Zen and how it influenced Japanese gardens.

◦       Differentiate between and describe schools of painting.

◦       Describe the tea ceremony’s impact on art, architecture, and culture.

◦       Analyze the ways in which folk art and refined rusticity impacted ceramic traditions.

◦       Identify specific influences on, and examples of, Japanese art.

19: Europe and America, 1700–1800
Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.C]

◦       Explain the influence of the Enlightenment on late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century art and architecture.

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of Rococo, Neoclassicism, and the “natural.”

◦       Discuss how social and political events, including the Industrial Revolution, affected artistic production of the period.

◦       Explain how ideas from contemporary philosophy and literature affected works of art and architecture.

◦       Identify and describe the new materials employed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

◦       Identify specific examples of eighteenth-century European and American art.

20: Europe and America, 1800–1870
Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.C]

◦       Explain the influence of the Enlightenment on late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century art and architecture.

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of Romanticism and Realism.

◦       Discuss how social and political events, including the Industrial Revolution, affected artistic production of the period.

◦       Explain how ideas from contemporary philosophy and literature affected works of art and architecture.

◦       Identify and describe the new materials employed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

◦       Identify specific examples of European and American art from this time period.

21: Europe and America, 1870–1900
Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.C]

◦       Define modernism and explain the shared characteristics of the Modernist movements.

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Realism, Symbolism, Arts and Crafts, and Art Nouveau.

◦       Describe the history of photography and its relationship with other fine arts media.

◦       Explain the philosophies and theories that governed the modernist movements of the later nineteenth century.

◦       Identify the social and historical contexts that affected the production of art and architecture.

◦       Identify specific examples of late nineteenth-century European and American art.

22: Africa After 1800

Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.III]

◦       Describe the artistic forms associated with the practice of ancestor veneration in African cultures.

◦       Describe and analyze Kongo power images, sculptural figures of the Dogon and Baule, and the carvings of Olowe of Ise.

◦       Explain the traditions associated with costumes and masquerades in African cultures.

◦       Discuss the art and ritual associated with the Igbo mbari house.

◦       Describe the art of body adornment and symbolism associated with the art.

◦       Identify specific traditions and artifacts from African culture.

23: Europe and America, 1900–1945
Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.D]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Dada, Neue Sachlichkeit, Surrealism, Constructivism, Suprematism, De Stijl, the International Style, Art Deco, Regionalism, and Mexican Muralism.

◦       Discuss abstraction and the principles of Cubism.

◦       Analyze the contributions of the founders of psychoanalysis and the artists and movements affected by psyche and dreams.

◦       Discuss the organic and its impact on Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture and on sculpture by Brancusi, Moore, and Calder.

◦       Explain the relationship of politics and art in the early twentieth century.

◦       Identify specific examples of early twentieth-century European and American art.

24: Europe and America After 1945
Learning Objectives [AR.9-12.II.D]

◦       Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of Abstract Expressionism, Post-Painterly Abstraction, Minimalism, Pop Art, and Superrealism.

◦       Explain the histories and theories of Performance Art, Conceptual Art, Site-Specific and Environmental Art, and postmodernism.

◦       Describe the introduction of new materials in later twentieth-century art.

◦       Discuss the theory of modernist formalism and the reactions against it.

◦       Identify the characteristics of modern and postmodern architecture.

◦       Explain the role of politics and consumer culture in late twentieth-century art.

◦       Identify specific examples of mid–twentieth-century European and American art.

Evidence that the class proposal impacts College and Career Readiness:

AP is a rigorous academic program built on the commitment, passion, and hard work of students and educators from both secondary schools and higher education. Since 1955, the AP Program has enabled millions of students to take college-level courses and exams, and to earn college credit or placement while still in high school.

A 2008 study found that AP students had better four-year graduation rates than those who did not take AP. For example, graduation rates for AP English Literature students were 62 percent higher than graduation rates for those who took other English courses in high school.

Taking AP also increases eligibility for scholarships and makes candidates more attractive to colleges:

  • ◦       31 percent of colleges and universities consider a student’s AP experience when making decisions about which students will receive scholarships.
  • ◦       85 percent of selective colleges and universities report that a student’s AP experience favorably impacts admissions decisions.

AP Art History is the single most rigorous and the lowest scoring of the current AP courses. Students who succeed in this course must master the ability to not only identify and contextualize cultural exemplars, they must become master researchers and writers, relying upon a very high level of communication and analysis, synthesizing diverse forms of information and elaborating upon them to make relevant connections. This is, in a nutshell, one very tough course.

Logistical information for course implementation for budget:

Required Textbooks

  • ◦       Kleiner, Fred S. (2008). Gardner’s Art Through the Ages (Thirteenth Edition.) Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning. 1248 pages, casebound, includes ArtStudy Student CD-ROM and InfoTrac
  • ◦       D’Alleva, Anne. (2007). Look! The Fundamentals of Art History (Second Edition.) Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc. 176 pages, paperback
  • ◦       We will also make extensive use of the publisher’s companion Web site for Gardner’s Art Through the Ages (Thirteenth Edition) as well as ArtStudy Online.
Updates for 2013-14.

Gardner’s Art Through the Ages (ISBN 0495915424) is now in the 14th edition, available in print at $203.49 per volume or in eBook format for $75.99 per volume. There is also an option to purchase individual chapters at $5.50 each, which makes good sense: it is impossible to teach the entire text in one year. If we budget for an average enrollment of fifteen students at each of our four high schools, we’re looking at a textbook startup budget of $12,209.40 if we decide upon traditional print, or $4,559.40 if we go with the eBook format.

 

In addition, a supplemental text would be highly advisable to ensure that the rigor of this writing/research based course is met. Look! The Fundamentals of Art History is $34.21 per volume; thus an additional startup expense of $2,052.60.

 

Teachers have already been identified and trained to teach this AP course during the summer of 2013, so no additional costs will be required at this time.

 

 

Updates for 2013-14.

The AP Art History course is undergoing an extensive revision for the 2015-16 year. We learned at the 2013 Summer Institute that College Board plans to provide teachers with all of the required reading. If this is accurate – and we will know for certain in October when these materials are released – it means that we will not need an art history book at all, and can supplement the course with online materials along with the D’Alleva text, Look!  This is, of course, entirely dependent upon College Board. It should also be noted that the scope and sequence noted in this document will undergo some modification to ensure alignment with the coming College Board course revisions.

Other Considerations

◦       Teachers will need to attend AP Institute training.

◦       Teachers are required to develop and submit an extensive syllabus for the AP course audit.

Updates for 2013-14.

Teachers have already been identified and trained to teach this AP course during the summer of 2013, so no additional costs associated with training will be required at this time.

 

Other:

This course would be planned for a full year credit. AP course participants who score at a 3, 4, or 5 level of assessment are also eligible for three hours of college credit at many (but not all) universities and post secondary institutions. This course would serve students interested in pursuing a post secondary college track for visual arts – especially those pursuing a BFA – as well as students tracking toward the social sciences and the liberal arts. This is a very advanced course and may most appropriately serve Junior and Senior students, but underclassmen may wish to pursue this learning experience also, given the emphasis and philosophies of Rigor and Relevance, and CCSS.

Updates for 2013-14.

A guaranteed and viable curriculum will need to be developed during the 2013-14 year in order for this course to be offered for the 2014-15 year. Curriculum writing will need to take place beyond the teacher contract day.

 

Updates for 2013-14.

Our current offering of AP Studio Art has an option for students to receive dual credit from the Kansas City Art Institute. If a student meets the course requirements and scores a 3, 4, or 5 on the exam they have the potential to earn as many as 7 hours of college credit (3 for the College Board score and 4 for the dual credit.) In conversation with our representatives at KCAI, we believe this dual credit option may also be available for AP Art History in our district. KCAI currently offers our dual enrollment students the option at an 85% reduction in their hour fees.

 

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